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Ancient Commentators


The Ancient Commentators project (1985-present) aims to translate the principal Greek commentaries on Aristotle into a modern language, many for the first time. These commentaries contain the scientific, medical, and philosophical development of late antiquity. Scroll down for details.

SCROLL DOWN

Ancient Commentators


The Ancient Commentators project (1985-present) aims to translate the principal Greek commentaries on Aristotle into a modern language, many for the first time. These commentaries contain the scientific, medical, and philosophical development of late antiquity. Scroll down for details.

The Ancient Commentators on Aristotle project began in 1985 under the direction of Richard Sorabji, with Michael Griffin as co-editor from 2013. It aims to translate the principal Greek commentaries on Aristotle into English for the first time (along with a number of related philosophical texts from late antiquity). These commentaries record the scientific, medical, and philosophical achievements of late antiquity, many of which are not currently available in any modern language. The project has been described by The Times newspaper as “a massive scholarly endeavour of the highest importance.”

To date, 100 volumes have been published or sent to press, with a further 23 assigned or under consideration. A number of explanatory volumes have also been published, including a three-volume sourcebook on the philosophy of the ancient commentators (1: Psychology, 2: Physics, 3: Logic and Metaphysics). The proceedings of a recent conference organized by the project have also been published.

Reviews of the Commentators Project

  • “A truly breathtaking achievement, with few parallels in the history of scholarly endeavour” (David Sedley, The Times Literary Supplement)
  • “One of the great scholarly achievements of our time” (Christopher Taylor, British Journal for the History of Philosophy)
  • “The Greek commentators are now being read around the world with an intensity of interest they have not received since they were first written” (Myles Burnyeat, Classical Association News)

Visit the project’s website for updates, personnel, and a list of forthcoming volumes.

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Teaching and Learning Liberal Arts


Can the humanities foster global citizenship by enhancing students’ capacity to understand and empathize with others? Can these qualities be treated as learning outcomes?

Teaching and Learning Liberal Arts


Can the humanities foster global citizenship by enhancing students’ capacity to understand and empathize with others? Can these qualities be treated as learning outcomes?

  • Teaching and learning innovation in the liberal arts: I began an interdisciplinary Scholarship of Teaching and Learning seed project  and TLEF project at UBC to investigate whether undergraduate humanities coursework influences measures such as cognitive empathy, dogmatism, and the capacity to articulate an opponent's position charitably, and to investigate whether these traits can be treated as learning outcomes and encouraged through different pedagogical techniques. This project is in progress: please contact me with any inquiries.
  • Midterm evaluation of teaching: I'm an early "beta tester" of UBC's Midterm Evaluation of Teaching project, which has been very helpful in my classes so far. 
  • Space for Notes: I've been co-developing an iPad app for collaborative note-taking in classroom and research settings, and outside, which I'll be trialling this year. More about 'Space' here.

 

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Ancient Sources podcasts


Ancient Sources showcases UBC research into the ancient world and its modern legacy.

Ancient Sources podcasts


Ancient Sources showcases UBC research into the ancient world and its modern legacy.

I am currently developing a short series of video podcasts, Ancient Sources, showcasing UBC's research into  the ancient Mediterranean world and its modern legacy. See the complete playlist here.

Latest Episode: Introducing Socrates

Trailer Episode

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Space for iPad


An experimental, tactile canvas for notes and ideas.

Space for iPad


An experimental, tactile canvas for notes and ideas.

Download for iPad 
[Coming soon]

Space is a simple, elegant visual canvas for ideas and notes. Tap to bring a circle to life; drag to group circles together. Circles respond to physics for natural, tactile organization. Space is designed for quick class notes, lists, meetings, and basic mind-mapping. Download version 1 on iTunes now and let us know what you think: the paint’s still wet! And visit spaceforthis.com for updates about the app.

Features (v. 1.0.0)

  • Tap to create nodes
  • Drag to arrange nodes (multitouch)
  • Notes respond to physics for natural, tactile interaction
  • Create additional note canvases
  • Drag down to trash nodes
  • Tap nodes to edit them

Features considered for potential future development

  • Collaboration and sharing (eventually real-time)
  • Clustering nodes (categorization)
  • Rich media (images, videos)